Adding Friction to Onboard Customers and Employees

Hacks ,Hiring

I just signed up for a Virtual Assistant Service.

They made it easy on me, by making it challenging.

What?

Yes. Stay with me here…

They could have simply given me a button that said, “Sign up here.” Then they could have taken my money. Yes, that would have been an “easy” process. But how many people would do it, and just sign up cold like that.

Instead, they added friction to me buying their service, and it made it easier.

Let me show you.

First, they didn’t ask me to buy. They just invite me to try.

After clicking that, they entice me to try it for free, and take my info…

They don’t stop there, because you know how many of us sign up for something like this, let it hit our email and do nothing, right?

So instead, they get me into action, immediately. They ask me to pick a task area, and if I do it within the time limit, then I get a $25 credit.

And then step by step, I pick the kind of task I want done:

I then go on to give them exact information…

And we’re on our way.

Yes, it’s a lot of steps, but, I believe it drivers higher conversion rates because:

a) They’re very easy.
b) It screens out those who are not serious.
c) I get immediate value, and they are selling by doing.

So how does this relate to your company internally?

Add friction to the hiring process.

1) Rather than post your job opportunities, put up a form to take their email address and their interests, so that you have a way of contacting them if a relevant job comes up. If you just show them the jobs and one doesn’t apply, then you’ve lost them forever.

2) Have them contribute a video of why they are a good candidate.

3) Ask them to use a very specific subject in an email to you, just to see if they can really follow instructions and pay attention to detail. If they can’t do this simple thing, they’re out.

4) Interview people in a group, have them work together on something and have each person say a recommendation for the others to get a job. You can tell how well they play in teams, and how much they’re willing to support the bigger goal.

Add friction to a new program.

When I started up the Goals Coach program at Zappos, we had only one coach for 1500 people. Rather than just opening up for coaching, we had them:

1) Apply to be in it, making them think about what they want and why.

2) They had to take a class about coaching and how it works

3) Now that they have had all their prep, the sessions only took 15 minutes, rather than a full hour, thus quadrupling capacity.

Where might you add friction in your business or in your culture in order to serve the higher goal?

The Great Culture Equalizer

Great cultures ,Hacks

It used to take me weeks to figure out a culture. I would spend a lot of time with the company and then write a long report about what’s going on.

Now I can quickly diagnose a culture with this question:

“Are people on time for meetings and do they end on time?”

For culture to work properly, it’s all about agreements – our cultural norms. And our realities can be so different that there’s not a lot we can agree on. Even something as simple as honesty can break down when you ask if white lies are okay, or if you argue whether taking pens home from the office is dishonest.

But one thing we can agree on is that we all go by the same clock.

Time is the great equalizer.

So when one person puts their time agenda above others, then the culture system breaks down. That may sound extreme but think of it this way…

Let’s say Bob is leading a meeting that’s supposed to end by 9am and he decides he needs 10 extra minutes to get his point across. Because Bob is a manager people feel like they have to stay.  Meanwhile Susan is losing time for her 9am meeting because she needs those people there, who (now) will not be on time.

To put it simply – Being late is all about prioritizing your own individual needs above the group needs. And that is when things break down.

Will being on time solve all problems? No, but it sets the foundation because:

a) People respect the whole over the individual (as a practice)

b) People learn to work with constraints

c) People learn to put integrity above any goal

In all my years of knowing Tony (CEO of Zappos) I have never once seen him be late (both personally and professionally).  And he is a leader who achieves a lot, has a ton of fun, and delegates like a master.

Don’t believe me.

Try it (just for a week) and see what happens.

Progression: The Key to Sustained Culture

Great cultures ,Hacks

One of the biggest challenges I hear from top performing cultures is how to keep their talent. In fact, some have speculated that the old adage, “People don’t quit companies, they quit their managers” is no longer true.

Top companies know that the key to keeping people is a strong progression plan, but they don’t know how to execute on it.

Russ Laraway figured out a great approach to progression while at Google. He discovered that a past/present/future conversation that is based on individuals (rather than positions and titles) is key.

  1. The Past

    This is the conversation to be like Barbara Walters and figure out what they have loved in the past. It’s about connecting the dots in their story.

  2. The Present

    The interviewer listens for the skills being developed and ask about what the person sees in their future (from the present view).

  3. The Future

    Now they co-create a plan together to help that person achieve those goals (both personally and professionally). The interesting part about the plan is that it’s not just about developing their skills, it’s also about developing their network (because that’s how you really get things done). I would also advise building their communication skills.

NOTE: As with any culture hack, it has to be co-created, and you have to keep experimenting. There is no “right way.”

The Culture Coffee Hack

Great cultures ,Hacks

culture-coffee

In the last blog post I talked about how drugs could impact corporate culture. Well, it turns out the best culture drug is very available and very legal. Most people actually use it, but I wouldn’t say they use it correctly. It’s called coffee.

Quick story: There was a company from Mexico that visited the Zappos Insights program. They saw the popcorn machine in the front and said that’s the culture hack they’re taking back home. I thought, “What?! You can’t think a popcorn machine will help culture.” Well, I was wrong. It became a central hub of conversation. A group of people took care of it, another group operated it, another group brought seasonings and flavors. Talk about co-creation around ritual!

I knew coffee could be a great ritual when I read about how Apple does it. But I was really happy to see a service bring it all together: Bloom.  They were launching a startup, and then…

To spice things up and quench a mad thirst for delicious coffee, we created a coffee corner in our office. Soon, we were brewing fresh coffee everyday with our coworkers. We knew more about who we were working with plus what they were working on.

The coffee culture we built not only made us more effective at our jobs, but made everyone’s days more enjoyable.

Now they have a service around providing quality coffees.  And it’s not just the quality, it’s the ritual, it’s the process. And of course, coming together.

And then there’s the Bulletproof coffee phenomenon I’ve talked about before. I’ve introduced it to people and went from six cups of coffee a day, down to one of Bulletproof.

While great coffee won’t solve all culture problems, I’ve definitely seen how weak cultures almost always serve weak coffee. (I’ve even seen them charge for it!)

If you do get into coffee, I recommend checking out how to hack the coffee experience.  

Let me know how it goes!  Robert@CultureBlueprint.com

 

 

Culture-enhancing drugs?

Culture of Chaos ,Hacks ,Productivity

When Lance Armstrong got to Europe for his first Tour de France, he quickly realized he had to either start doping or accept losing to those who did. It was a different game.

Could corporate America go the same direction? It’s possible.

Silicon Valley executives have long been known to take modafinil (brand name Provigil) to gain a cognitive edge, and it seems that Wall Street does as well.  Still others create their own “custom stacks” of over the counter supplements.

These smart drugs seem to speed up the brain, and yet other workers use the effects of marijuana to focus and reduce stress.

And what about for insights and ideas?  In this piece on CNN, Venture Capitalist Tim Ferriss shares that every billionaire he knows “takes psychedelics on a regular basis.

And if we look at the offices of a smart drug supplement company, what do they do to get that extra edge?  Fasting.  Nootrobox‘s employees stop eating from Monday night to Wednesday morning every week.  This article in Fortune explains the psychology of why fasting actually enhances our cognition.

Could performance-enhancement be the new reality of companies that outperform the others, the way doped riders took all the awards at the Tour de France?

The #1 Culture Hack

Great cultures ,Hacks ,Popular Articles

NOTE: This blog is the #1 overall hack, for the #1 HIRING HACK, please click here.

“Don’t talk about how to hack culture! That will scare corporate clients!”

That’s what people told me.

They were so wrong! The bigger the company, the more they want the hacks. Why? Because hacking is all about empowering anyone to create a shift. Big companies know how hard it is to create massive change. Culture hacks allow change to happen FAST.

First, let’s briefly define what hacking is:

Hacking is finding a vulnerable point in a system, and exploiting that vulnerability to your advantage. The end result is very little investment with maximum gain.

If that made no sense, don’t worry. The hacks work without you needing to know how they work.

I knew about this #1 hack for a long time, but didn’t realize how important it was until I was working with a major company that wanted to implement its core values and they were running into a problem:

People put working hard and driving results over each of those core values. And because of that, they’re not core values. If they were core, they would never be sacrificed.

Changing to a Core values company is a big step. It can take over a year. So how can they change fast?

Well, to diagnose a culture all we have to do is look at their meetings. Meetings are a subset of culture. And the first data within meetings we look at is people’s relationship to time.

  • Are people on time?
  • Do meetings end on time?
  • Do leaders show up late?

Cultures that are on time inherently respect each other. Cultures that start late and go late tolerate behavior that advances the individual over the culture as a whole.

The #1 Culture Hack: Always be on time.

  1. Start meetings on time (even if not everyone is there)
  2. End meetings on time (or 10 minutes early so they have time to walk to their next meeting)
  3. Have the same standard for all people (no matter their rank)

When I was at Zappos, CEO Tony Hsieh was always on time or early. Never ever did I see him late.

This is a very small hack, but it has a massive impact. If you feel resistance from yourself or anyone else, simply run a 2 week experiment where people have to be on time. Then let the results speak for themselves.