The Culture Power Tool to Reduce Friction

Now, at first this power tool may seem disappointing. Like if I told you I have the secret to weight loss and said, “Workouts.” But… there are workouts you dread and then there’s the Peloton experience with great music, instruction and a crowd. Same, but different. 

So the power tool is the org chart.  Yes, that incredibly boring outline that always seems to be out of date (that’s half the problem). 

Typical org charts look like this:

Notice how dull and uninspiring it is. Why even look at it?   

The reason we don’t is because it’s not actually useful. But the potential is huge. Why? Because the bigger the company gets, the more people get confused about who does what. Who has the authority? Who is the gatekeeper? Who has domain expertise?

Imagine you have a new idea, and you don’t even know whom to talk to about it.  

Take a look at this map I did for my team at Zappos (and beyond the words, notice the feeling you have about it as you look at it). When my team saw it, it felt like a breath of fresh air. 

The opportunity is to make it come alive in the following ways:

1. Use photos rather than names. 

Using just a name and a title reduces people to letters. Humanize it. 

2. Show actual roles and responsibilities

Titles are not only boring, they’re often not fully descriptive or they assume a lot of knowledge of the person reading it. Your people aren’t there to figure out the code of titles. They’re there to do the work. And this lack of information adds unnecessary friction. 

3. Keep it up to date

I just consulted for one the world’s largest social media companies. I said a caveat to my recommendation when I said, “This may sound really ridiculous…”  And I told them that for a company their size, having a full time org chart updater actually makes sense.  This role goes beyond word and graphic updates. It takes a curious mind, a great communicator and an ability to connect people in various roles (like playing the game Memory). 

For more on this see the chapter on “The Corporate Navigator” in my book, The Culture Blueprint: The Guide to the High Performance Workplace.